Modulation of the immune system through the administration of Administration of a fusion protein

26 November 2014

BPRC - 1. Modulation of the immune system through the administration of Administration of a fusion protein

Cells of the immune system protect the body by attacking and eliminating pathogens. In Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients however, for unknown reasons, these cells show abnormal responses against tissues normally present in the body, causing tissue damage that can ultimately lead to MS.

In a marmoset model for MS, BPRC researchers have attempted to control these (auto) aggressive cells by administering a specific fusion protein. By re-enforcing tolerance of the aggressive cells, the disease MS might be counteracted. A detailed analysis showed that upon administration of the fusion protein the cells of the immune system of marmosets were indeed less reactive. Unfortunately, this did not result in a different course of the MS-related disease EAE in marmosets. Therefore, this strategy to combat MS needs further development in order to not only change the reactivity of the immune system, but in addition counteract the disease. These findings are described in Clinical Experimental Immunology.