News

Page 11 of 17.
In total there are 168 English news articles.

20 March 2013
New ways to target the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

New ways to target the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)


In HIV infected humans, antibodies have been identified that can prevent infection in cell cultures by binding to an essential region close to the membrane of the virus. While it is highly attractive to include this part of the virus in an anti-HIV/AIDS vaccine, previous attempts to obtain similar immune responses by immunization have failed. Using llamas and a special delivery vehicle, researchers have now found ways to solve this problem.

7 March 2013
Multiple Instances of Ancient Balancing Selection Shared Between Humans and Chimpanzees

Multiple Instances of Ancient Balancing Selection Shared Between Humans and Chimpanzees


Investigations into the total DNA (genome) of humans and animals can explain the importance of different regions of the DNA and the underlying selection pressure. A comparison of the chimpanzee and human genome has given new insights with regards to their ancestors.

7 March 2013
BPRC article recommended by F1000

BPRC article recommended by F1000


F1000 is a website for which a selected group of expert scientists, highly respected in their chosen fields can recommend scientific articles of high quality. Recently, on this website, work performed at the BPRC and described in the article ‘Transgenic Fluorescent Plasmodium cynomolgi Liver Stages Enable Live Imaging and Purification of MalariaHypnozoite-Forms, Plos One, 2013, has been identified by F1000 as being of special significance in its field.

4 March 2013
The use of a combination of proteins as potential malaria vaccine

The use of a combination of proteins as potential malaria vaccine


Malaria parasites can differ greatly from one another. This makes it difficult to develop a vaccine on the basis of a single protein. To tackle the parasite on multiple fronts, current work is focused on a combination of proteins as vaccine.

14 February 2013
An explanation for the mode of action of the anti-MS drug natalizumab

An explanation for the mode of action of the anti-MS drug natalizumab


Natalizumab (Tysabri®) is an effective drug against multiple sclerosis (MS). Natalizumab prevents the infiltration of white blood cells into the brain of MS patients. It acts by binding to two protein variants: alpha4beta1 and alpha4beta7. The alpha4beta1 protein is responsible for the reduced entrance of white blood cells in the brain. The alpha4beta7 protein is mainly involved in the infiltration of white blood cells into the intestines, but the role of alpha4beta7 in the infiltration of the brain is unclear. BPRC research provides more insight.

28 January 2013
Visualization of dormant malaria parasites

Visualization of dormant malaria parasites


Treatment of the malaria parasite P. vivax is complicated because the parasite forms dormant stages in the liver that can re-activate after months, sometimes even after years and cause malaria again. The course of this process is a complete mystery. By joining forces, three Dutch malaria research groups have now for the first time shown live images of these dormant parasites of a primate malaria.

21 January 2013
Can chronic forms of autoimmune diseases be caused by a dysregulated immune response to injury?

Can chronic forms of autoimmune diseases be caused by a dysregulated immune response to injury?


The immune system is equipped for protecting the body against infection with viruses, bacteria or parasites. While most people experience the benefits of this highly complex defense system, an increasing proportion of the population suffers from the hazardous consequences of unwanted and often detrimental immune activities that can result in allergy or autoimmune-mediated inflammatory disease (AIMID) such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The early, acute phase of AIMID can be treated with reasonable success, while an effective treatment of the late, chronic phase of disease is often lacking. Researchers are looking for clues to resolve this issue.

21 January 2013
An analysis of malaria proteins that have been sent into the red blood cell and onto the surface of the cell

An analysis of malaria proteins that have been sent into the red blood cell and onto the surface of the cell


In severe cases, malaria parasites can adhere to the small blood vessels in various organs, including the brain, and cause a state of coma that may eventually lead to death. The majority of deaths caused by malaria is due to this type of malaria. The mechanisms that play a role are largely unknown. Together with colleagues of Leiden University and collaborators throughout Europe, BPRC researchers are developing models to study this type of malaria.

12 November 2012
Evaluation of IL-28B variants and serum IP-10 in hepatitis-C

Evaluation of IL-28B variants and serum IP-10 in hepatitis-C


Worldwide an estimated 170 million people are chronically infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) and are therefore at risk to develop liver diseases, like cirrhosis and liver cancer. The development of a chronic HCV infection is partly dependent on the genetic background of a patient, particularly near the IL-28B gene. Another important predictive marker for the development of a chronic HCV infection is the presence of high levels of the protein IP-10 in the blood of patients. Both IL-28B and IP-10 are part of the so called 'innate immune system’. Therefore it is important to determine whether these two factors are connected to eachother.

30 October 2012
Opening of the new BPRC facilities

Opening of the new BPRC facilities


The new BPRC facilities were formally opened on Tuesday 30 October 2012. A large number of dignitaries were present representing all the major social and scientific organisations within the Netherlands.

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