News

Page 6 of 17.
In total there are 165 English news articles.

16 September 2015
BPRC director Bontrop in dutch newspaper

BPRC director Bontrop in dutch newspaper


In the Dutch newspaper ‘Algemeen Dagblad’ of August 27 2015 BPRC director Ronald Bontrop discusses the monkey research that is performed at the BPRC.

26 August 2015
Testing of a therapeutic antibody against MS like disease in marmosets shows two opposite effects

Testing of a therapeutic antibody against MS like disease in marmosets shows two opposite effects


In a mouse model for multiple sclerosis (MS), a therapeutic antibody against a substance of the immune system, IL-7, was 100% effective in preventing disease. BPRC scientists determined whether this effect could be translated to primates.

21 August 2015
BPRC Annual Scientific Report 2014

BPRC Annual Scientific Report 2014


We here present the BPRC 2014 Annual Scientific Report and show especially the research highlights of the selected topic ‘Infectious Diseases’.

24 July 2015
A new long-duration drug with broad activity against malaria parasites

A new long-duration drug with broad activity against malaria parasites


Malaria continues to kill up to 580.000 people each year, the majority being children under 5 years old. An effective vaccine is still lacking, and therefore efforts to combat the disease focus on insecticide-treated bed nets and drugs. Unfortunately, these efforts are threatened by emerging resistance of the parasite to current therapies.

8 July 2015
What happens inside the BPRC? VICE filmed the facilities and made a comprehensive documentary

What happens inside the BPRC? VICE filmed the facilities and made a comprehensive documentary


VICE is a young medium that makes documentaries for the Internet. At the end of 2014, struck by the debate on animal testing and the BPRC, VICE came with the request to film at the BPRC facilities.

1 July 2015
Why does multiple sclerosis only affect humans?

Why does multiple sclerosis only affect humans?


Multiple sclerosis (MS) develops exclusively in humans. Non-human primates are resistant against MS, although they seem to be highly susceptible to experimentally induced MS-like disease. Unraveling of the cause(s) underlying this discrepancy is highly relevant as insights might be gained into the elusive event(s) that trigger(s) MS.

22 June 2015
Monkey models for pandemic H1N1 influenza virus research

Monkey models for pandemic H1N1 influenza virus research


Influenza continues to threaten a large part of the world´s population, mainly young children, elderly and people with a compromised immune system. The influenza virus differs from year to year, complicating vaccination strategies. More research is warranted to combat this important disease. BPRC researchers have characterized an influenza virus infection in different monkey species to establish a model system for influenza research that mimics the human situation.

22 June 2015
Extreme selection on regions of the X-chromosome of great apes

Extreme selection on regions of the X-chromosome of great apes


BPRC researchers contributed to a new international study, which investigated how selection is operating on the female X-chromosome of great apes. This study, published in PNAS (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25941379), suggests that specific parts of this chromosome in great apes show strong signatures of natural selection resulting in the reduction of diversity.

9 June 2015
Monkey malaria infection in humans: different monkey species are involved

Monkey malaria infection in humans: different monkey species are involved


Humans can be infected with different species of the malaria parasite. These species were originally acquired from other primate hosts. Currently, in Southeast Asia, human infections caused by a primate malaria that has not been seen before in humans, Plasmodium knowlesi, are emerging. Genetic analyses of these infections shed light on the origin and the potential risks for spreading of this new pathogen for humans.

9 June 2015
PhD awarded to Céline van der Putten at Utrecht University

PhD awarded to Céline van der Putten at Utrecht University


On 27 May 2015 Céline van der Putten successfully defended her Ph.D. thesis entitled ‘Modulation of Toll-like Receptor-mediated activation of Microglia’.

Microglia are a specific type of cells from the immune system that reside in the central nervous system (CNS). These cells have important functions in the healthy CNS as well as during pathogenic conditions. Microglia can contribute to the initiation, progression and resolution of disease processes. Activated microglia are involved in many diseases of the CNS, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), but their exact role is not yet clear.

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